“His and Her” Pancakes

Aug 2nd

During mine and my husband’s engagement time, I (for some strange reason) would picture our wedded bliss involving lazing around on Saturday mornings, me making pancakes, him watching Sports Center. I can remember one of our first Saturdays, waking up and saying, all eager eyed, “Do you want PANCAKES?!” Had I not met my husband? I shouldn’t have been surprised by his response. It had something to do with early morning basketball at the gym, pancakes sitting in his stomach like a brick, and “can I have my regular protein shake?”. I felt deflated.

Every once in a while, though, I catch him at a good time and he says yes to pancakes. It’s always cozy and wonderful and just how I pictured it.

I hate wasting food, so pancakes used to present a problem. I only wanted 2 at the most, he would really only eat 4 or 5, and what pancake recipe out there makes 6 pancakes? I found a great Bon Appetite recipe that for some reason made a smallish batch; Icut it in half, and it has become my go-to, two person pancake recipe. In serving this breakfast, there are some male/female discrepancies. Read on to find out!

“His and Her” Pancakes

1 1/2 egg (1/2 an egg is two tbsp. beaten egg)

1/4 c. sugar

2 tbsp. melted butter

3/4 c. flour

1/2 c. skim milk

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/8 tsp. salt

Fruit for serving

1.To start, heat your griddle to low heat (so you won’t have to wait later for it heat).

2. In a medium bowl, mix egg, sugar, and melted butter (make sure butter is cool enough that it doesn’t cook your eggs). As you add your butter, pour it on the side of the bowl as your stir the mixture with a fork. This way, if your butter is still too warm you will lessen the chance of cooking your eggs.

(To get your half an egg, crack an egg into a small bowl and beat with a fork. Pour out into a tablespoon, twice. That is half an egg).

3. Add flour and milk alternately (1/3 of the flour, 1/2 of the milk, 1/3 of the flour, rest of milk, rest of flour); mixing batter in between.

4. Add baking powder and salt and stir into batter.

5. Bring griddle to a medium/medium-high heat.

6. Spread about 1 tbsp. butter (or cooking spray if going lighter) onto griddle.

7. Spread pancakes into 4 rounds on griddle. Don’t mess with pancakes until small bubbles break the surface and the edges are set. Flip and continue to cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned.

8. For the “his” pancakes, pile all four on a plate and serve with sliced bananas, cinnamon, butter and maple syrup.

9. Add the last two pancakes to the griddle and cook the same way as before.

10. To serve the “hers” pancakes, serve with a sliced peach/nectarine/plum/strawberries and a hefty scoop of nonfat, plain Greek yogurt. Sprinkle cinnamon over pancakes and yogurt. Add just a bit of syrup if needed.

*So his and hers:

1. Bananas are 120 calories each, peaches 45, plums 13, strawberries 4 per berry. All fruit is good for you, but when it comes to calories, some are better than others.

2. Pancakes are delicious but they don’t really do much for you. I try to consider protein in my breakfast, and pancakes don’t cut it on their own. Greek yogurt is a great addition and using it with your pancakes/waffles cuts down on your need for syrup (syrup, even beautifully natural maple syrup, is 220 calories per 1/4 c. It should be used sparingly or not at all if you’re watching calories).

3. By adding the yogurt and the abundant (but low calorie) fruit, you can sit down with said male and enjoy your big breakfast of pancakes, but save yourself hundreds (yes, hundreds) of calories.

4. Did you know that in the first few years of marriage, women gain an average of 5 pounds? Maybe it’s because you’re eating the same as your husband. Don’t, they can take in WAY more calories than us and not gain a thing. It’s annoying to make two different meals though. “His and Her” pancakes illustrate how you can cook the same meals but differentiate to suit your needs!

“His and Her” Pancakes

1 1/2 egg (1/2 an egg is two tbsp. beaten egg)

1/4 c. sugar

2 tbsp. melted butter

3/4 c. flour

1/2 c. skim milk

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/8 tsp. salt

Fruit for serving

1.To start, heat your griddle to low heat (so you won’t have to wait later for it heat).

2. In a medium bowl, mix egg, sugar, and melted butter (make sure butter is cool enough that it doesn’t cook your eggs).

3. Add flour and milk alternately (1/3 of the flour, 1/2 of the milk, 1/3 of the flour, rest of milk, rest of flour); mixing batter in between.

4. Add baking powder and salt and stir into batter.

5. Bring griddle to a medium/medium-high heat.

6. Spread about 1 tbsp. butter (or cooking spray if going lighter) onto griddle.

7. Spread pancakes into 4 rounds on griddle. Don’t mess with pancakes until small bubbles break the surface and the edges are set. Flip and continue to cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned.

8. For the “his” pancakes, pile all four on a plate and serve with sliced bananas, cinnamon, butter and maple syrup.

9. Add the last two pancakes to the griddle and cook the same way as before.

10. To serve the “hers” pancakes, serve with a sliced peach/nectarine/plum/strawberries and a hefty scoop of nonfat, plain greek yogurt. Sprinkle cinnamon over pancakes and yogurt. Add just a bit of syrup if needed.

*So his and hers:

1. Bananas are 120 calories each, peaches 45, plums 13, strawberries 4 per berry. All fruit is good for you, but when it comes to calories, some are better than others.

2. Pancakes are delicious but they don’t really do much for you. I try to consider protein in my breakfast, and pancakes don’t cut it on their own. Greek yogurt is a great addition and using it with your pancakes/waffles cuts down on your need for syrup (syrup, even beautifully natural maple syrup, is 220 calories per 1/4 c. It should be used sparingly or not at all if you’re watching calories).

3. By adding the yogurt and the abundant (but low calorie) fruit, you can sit down with said male and enjoy your big breakfast of pancakes, but save yourself hundreds (yes, hundreds) of calories.

4. Did you know that in the first few years of marriage, women gain an average of 5 pounds? Maybe it’s because you’re eating the same as your husband. Don’t, they can take in WAY more calories than us and not gain a thing. It’s annoying to make two different meals though. “His and Her” pancakes illustrate how you can cook the same meals but differentiate to suit your needs!

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